Fashbaugh's Pavillion - Traverse City MI

Address: US-31 on Silver Lake
City: Traverse City
State: MI
Zip: 49685
County: Grand Traverse
Number of visits to this page: 1057
General Information:

Source: Cole Maxson

From the Silver Lake Improvement Association:

"The land was originally part of a homestead grant, secured by the Brakel family. The Brakels still farm some of the land and live on some of its parcels on and around Brakel Point. In the 1920’s, Oliver Fasbaugh, from Canton, Ohio struck a deal with the Brakels for the property that would become the Fashbaugh Resort. After purchasing the empty parcel, Oliver went about the task of securing two contracts for rental cabins. He then returned to the property to build the cabins, just in time for the arrival of the tenants.

Oliver then built the hotel, which was a boarding facility that also housed his family. He then added two more cabins. Many people came for the entire summer, especially single professional men who stayed in the hotel. Of course, this was during the era of Prohibition and Oliver was a keen businessman. He built a copper whiskey still and supplied some of the area’s most prominent people with rye whiskey. His wife had the recipe and Oliver was the bootlegger. The whiskey still remained in the residence until the Fashbaughs sold it to the Egelus, so Don Fashbaugh, the grandson of Oliver, donated it to the Buckley Old Engine Show, and it has been displayed there.

In the 1930’s, Oliver built a dance hall, named Fashbaugh’s Pavilion. The building was 75 feet square, with a maple dance floor that measured 50 feet by 50 feet. Considering that it was built in the midst of the Great Depression, it was a risky business venture, but one that paid off nicely. There was a sizable demand for a speakeasy that also provided music and dancing. People drove great distances to be part of the action. The dance hall was used into the 1950’s with its latter years holding fund raiser dances for the Grawn Sportsmen Club. After that, it was used as storage, with this author’s boat, among others, wintering there. The dance hall was torn down in the 1980’s.

In the late 1940’s, Oliver left his wife and family. He also left his hotel/residence, with three rental rooms, one large community bath and a large parlor. He left his still, his dance hall, his four rental cabins. His son Art took over the property and helped his mother continue to run the resort. They added a boat livery in the 1950’s. Art married Matilda and they operated the resort into the 1980’s. Then his son Don built a home on the property and helped his mother, who continued to rent the cottages into her late eighties. Don’s son Dave and his family currently live on a parcel that was once part of the resort. Dave’s children make five generations of Fashbaughs that have occupied land along the shores of Silver Lake" - Information from Don Fashbaugh

It appears as though the land that the pavillion would have sat on is at (44.67879387992895, -85.67475314022019)

Info Updates:
5/19/2022 - Cole Maxson
From the Silver Lake Improvement Association: "The land was originally part of a homestead grant, secured by the Brakel family. The Brakels still farm some of the land and live on some of its parcels on and around Brakel Point. In the 1920’s, Oliver Fasbaugh, from Canton, Ohio struck a deal with the Brakels for the property that would become the Fashbaugh Resort. After purchasing the empty parcel, Oliver went about the task of securing two contracts for rental cabins. He then returned to the property to build the cabins, just in time for the arrival of the tenants. Oliver then built the hotel, which was a boarding facility that also housed his family. He then added two more cabins. Many people came for the entire summer, especially single professional men who stayed in the hotel. Of course, this was during the era of Prohibition and Oliver was a keen businessman. He built a copper whiskey still and supplied some of the area’s most prominent people with rye whiskey. His wife had the recipe and Oliver was the bootlegger. The whiskey still remained in the residence until the Fashbaughs sold it to the Egelus, so Don Fashbaugh, the grandson of Oliver, donated it to the Buckley Old Engine Show, and it has been displayed there. In the 1930’s, Oliver built a dance hall, named Fashbaugh’s Pavilion. The building was 75 feet square, with a maple dance floor that measured 50 feet by 50 feet. Considering that it was built in the midst of the Great Depression, it was a risky business venture, but one that paid off nicely. There was a sizable demand for a speakeasy that also provided music and dancing. People drove great distances to be part of the action. The dance hall was used into the 1950’s with its latter years holding fund raiser dances for the Grawn Sportsmen Club. After that, it was used as storage, with this author’s boat, among others, wintering there. The dance hall was torn down in the 1980’s. In the late 1940’s, Oliver left his wife and family. He also left his hotel/residence, with three rental rooms, one large community bath and a large parlor. He left his still, his dance hall, his four rental cabins. His son Art took over the property and helped his mother continue to run the resort. They added a boat livery in the 1950’s. Art married Matilda and they operated the resort into the 1980’s. Then his son Don built a home on the property and helped his mother, who continued to rent the cottages into her late eighties. Don’s son Dave and his family currently live on a parcel that was once part of the resort. Dave’s children make five generations of Fashbaughs that have occupied land along the shores of Silver Lake" - Information from Don Fashbaugh It appears as though the land that the pavillion would have sat on is at (44.67879387992895, -85.67475314022019)
 Photos:4
Fashbaughs Pavillion - OLD POST CARD PHOTO
OLD POST CARD PHOTO
Fashbaughs Pavillion - 1954 AERIAL PHOTO
1954 AERIAL PHOTO
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